EPC Register - Energy Performance Certificates

Energy Performance Certificate's or EPC's are a report required for all dwellings and non-dwellings upon construction, sale or rent and was introduced using a phased approach from 6 April 2008

What is an EPC?

E.P.C. is actually an Acronym

It represents the initial letters of the words Energy, Performance and Certificate


Its a three to five page report, that assesses the energy efficiency of a property, and recommends specific ways in which the efficiency can be improved. 


Because 40% of all CO2 emissions in the UK come from buildings, EPC's were introduced in 2008 to keep an eye on and ultimately help reduce this percentage. 


EPC's are now a legal requirement for any building being sold, let, renovated or constructed, and must be made available to potential buyers as soon as the property is marketed. 


The survey itself is a non-invasive, visual only inspection, that requires access to all rooms, as well as all attics, cupboards, garages and basements. The assessor will take approximately 45 mins to inspect the properties heating systems, measure the volume of space which these heat and record the materials used to retain that heat (such as walls, windows and doors etc.). 


All buildings are rated between A and G in the certificates. A’ being the most energy efficient, and G’ being the least and are all valid for a period of 10 years, unless voided. 


The average property rating in the UK is between D - E for both Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions.

EPC Register Energy Performance Certificate, EPC, EPC Rating, EPC Certificate, EPC Check EPCRegister

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Non Domestic EPC (Commercial EPC)

You must have a Non Domestic EPC (Commercial EPC) if


  • You decide to rent out or sell the premises
  • A building under construction is finished
  • There are changes to the number of parts used for separate occupation and these changes involve providing or extending fixed heating, air conditioning or mechanical ventilation systems

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Is an EPC a legal requirement?

Is an EPC a legal requirement?

Is an EPC a legal requirement?

EPC's are now a legal requirement for any building being sold, let, renovated or constructed, and must be made available to potential buyers as soon as the property is marketed. If you rent your property you also must meet MEES legally.

What is MEES?

Is an EPC a legal requirement?

Is an EPC a legal requirement?

MEES is a set of Minimum Energy Efficiency Standard Regulations set by the government which require a minimum energy efficiency level epc rating e for domestic & non domestic private rented properties on the epc register.


How long does an EPC last?

Is an EPC a legal requirement?

How long does an EPC last?

An E.P.C. (EPC rating) aka EPC Certificate is valid for a period of 10 Years from the date which it is officially lodged onto the central landmark government epc register database, until voided.

Can you fail an EPC?

What is the point of an EPC?

How long does an EPC last?

The short answer is NO! Even if you get a 1 (G), you still haven't failed an epc rating. However if you wish to rent the property you will have to meet MEES before lodging your certificate on the epc register.

Is my property exempt?

What is the point of an EPC?

What is the point of an EPC?

Exemption is rare! However there is a very specific list of Exempt properties so please check your property against this before booking your epc certificate with one of our accredited assessors from the epc register

What is the point of an EPC?

What is the point of an EPC?

What is the point of an EPC?

Because 40% of all CO2 emissions in the UK come from buildings, EPC's were introduced in 2008 to keep an eye on and ultimately help reduce this percentage. 

How much does an EPC cost?

Who is responsible for EPC landlord or tenant?

Who is responsible for EPC landlord or tenant?

Prices range from £34 right up through £150. Beware these low offers are there to lure you in and then hit you with further hidden charges. Many are not insured, use the worst trades people and have no customer support. 

Who is responsible for EPC landlord or tenant?

Who is responsible for EPC landlord or tenant?

Who is responsible for EPC landlord or tenant?

The landlord is always responsible for the EPC. The landlord is also responsible for providing the tenant with a copy of the EPC and the Tenant is entitled to request basic improvements.

Who pays EPC report?

Who is responsible for EPC landlord or tenant?

Who pays EPC report?

Landlords, Property Owners and Real Estate Actors such as estate agents, letting agents, property managers etc) always pay for the EPC services. The tenant never pays for an EPC.

Further EPC Information

Aim of the EPC

"The main aim of the EPC is to serve as an information tool for building owners, occupiers and real estate actors. Therefore, EPCs can be a powerful market tool to create demand for energy efficiency in buildings by targeting such improvements as a decision-making criterion in real-estate transactions, and by providing recommendations for the cost-effective or cost-optimal upgrading of the energy performance."

October 2014 - Buildings Performance Institute Europe (BPIE)

EPC Register Energy Performance Certificate, EPC, EPC Rating, EPC Certificate, EPC Check EPCRegister
EPC Register Energy Performance Certificate, EPC, EPC Rating, EPC Certificate, EPC Check EPCRegister

EPC's in the U.K. (extract from full report)


The UK follows a “regional” approach to the EPC registry spanning over three jurisdictions: one for England and Wales, one for Northern Ireland and one for Scotland. 


The EPC register for England and Wales is operated by Landmark Information Group, which receives no government funding. It operates the register on behalf of the Secretary of State for the Department for Communities and Local Government. Landmark does not collect the data and is only required to accept submissions from approved energy assessor accreditation schemes. The contract operates on the basis that Landmark will recover all costs for establishing, operating and maintaining the registers by charging a lodgement fee for documents lodged on the registers. 


There are two sub-registers in England and Wales, a domestic register in operation since May 2007 and a non-domestic register in operation since December 2008. The registers are the only official place to store energy certificate data and only an energy assessor can lodge data on to the register via their accreditation scheme. 


An EPC is only valid if it has been generated from data lodged on the register, and each set of data has been allocated a report reference number. If an EPC is not lodged, it is not valid and cannot be used when a building is sold or rented or when the construction of the building has been completed. 


The energy assessor will lodge information about the building (a unique report reference number, the address of the building, age, construction method, materials, etc.), energy use, emissions and other calculated values as well as cost-effective recommendations. In addition to those, for non-domestic buildings, the energy assessor will also mention the heating services, lighting controls and information on the envelope of the building. 


Energy performance certificates lodged on the registers were previously retrieved using a report reference number. From 2012, the feature to search for reports, without a report reference number by using a postcode or street name and post town, was introduced. 


EPCs retrieved from the registers are free of charge using both of these processes, allowing individuals to look up certificates online, allowing comparison of the energy performance of properties. However, anyone with an EPC can ‘opt-out’ of having their data made publicly available in a way that makes their property identifiable during data searches. 


Registered data can also be provided as bulk data to authorised recipients as defined in the amended Energy Performance of Buildings (England and Wales) Regulations 2012. According to the Regulations, this data can be used for the following purposes: 

• Promoting energy efficiency improvements; 

• Conducting research, developing or analysing policy (or policy proposals) in relation to the energy efficiency of buildings, and the effectiveness or impact of energy efficiency improvements; 

• Identifying geographic areas where the energy efficiency of buildings is low relative to other areas, or conducting research into the extent, causes or consequences of such low levels of efficiency; 

• Promoting and marketing energy efficiency improvements that may be made pursuant to a green deal plan;

 • Identifying and analysing the impact of carbon emissions on the environment resulting from buildings with low levels of energy efficiency; 

• Determining whether energy efficiency improvements that may be made pursuant to a green deal plan have or have not been made in respect of a particular building or buildings. 


The registers for England and Wales are currently the largest ones in Europe, holding the data of more than 12 million domestic and non-domestic EPCs up to May 2014.

Credit

Extract from: 

A Mapping of National Approaches

Published in October 2014

 by the Buildings Performance Institute Europe (BPIE)

http://bpie.eu/

EPC Register Energy Performance Certificate, EPC, EPC Rating, EPC Certificate, EPC Check EPCRegister

History of the EPC

The EU Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD)

EPC Certificates were introduced in England and Wales on 1 August 2007 as part of Home Information Packs (HIPs) for domestic properties with four or more bedrooms. 


Over time this requirement was extended to smaller properties. The scheme for HIPs was extended to encompass three bedroom homes from 10 September 2007. 


When the requirement for HIPs was removed in May 2010, the epc register and the epc rating requirement for EPCs continued. 


They are a result of European Union Directive 2002/91/EC relating to the energy performance of buildings, as transposed into British law by the Housing Act 2004 and The Energy Performance of Buildings (Certificates and Inspections) (England and Wales) Regulations 2007 (S.I. 2007/991).

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